Promising early results for lisdexamfetamine as treatment for symptoms of menopause

Menopausal women frequently report cognitive deficits. A new therapy to address these deficits may be on the horizon, with promising early results for the psychostimulant lisdexamfetamine, which is used to treat attention deficit-hyperactivity disorder

Menopausal women frequently report cognitive deficits, particularly in higher-level skills used to control other cognitive behaviours — collectively known as executive functions (EF). A new therapy to address these deficits may be on the horizon, with promising early results for the psychostimulant lisdexamfetamine, which is already used to treat attention deficit-hyperactivity disorder.

In a small trial involving 32 healthy perimenopausal and postmenopausal women with new-onset EF complaints, lisdexamfetamine was significantly more effective than placebo for improving scores on the Brown Attention Deficit Disorder Scale and for improving delayed paragraph recall. A potential drawback was the drug’s effect on systolic blood pressure and heart rate, both of which were increased significantly by lisdexamfetamine.

Long-term studies are warranted to explore the risk-benefit profile of the drug in menopausal women, say the researchers in Psychopharmacology
[1]
(online, 11 June 2015). 

References

[1] Epperson CN, Shanmugan S, Kim DR et al. New onset executive function difficulties at menopause: a possible role for lisdexamfetamine. Psychopharmacology 2015. doi:10.1007/s00213-015-3953-7.

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Citation
The Pharmaceutical Journal, PJ, 27 June/4 July 2015, Vol 294, No 7868/9;294(7868):DOI:10.1211/PJ.2015.20068817