Glaucoma treatment may counter the virulence of tuberculosis

Researchers showed ethoxzolamide, a sulfonamide and carbonic anhydrase inhibitor used to treat glaucoma and duodenal ulcers, reduced mycobacterium tuberculosis (micrograph pictured) growth in both macrophages and infected mice

Mycobacterium tuberculosis must sense and adapt to environmental cues in order to establish and maintain infection in a host. It does this in part via a signal transduction system called PhoPR.

After screening more than 200,000 compounds, US researchers have identified a drug that inhibits the PhoPR regulon, so it could be used to dampen the virulence of M. tuberculosis infection. The drug is ethoxzolamide — a sulfonamide and carbonic anhydrase inhibitor used to treat glaucoma and duodenal ulcers, and a diuretic.

Having identified the compound, the researchers then showed ethoxzolamide reduced M. tuberculosis growth in both macrophages and infected mice. “We propose that ethoxzolamide may be pursued as a new class of antivirulence therapy,” they write in
Antimicrobial Agents and Chemotherapy
(2015;59(8):4436–4445)[1]
.

References

[1] Johnson BK, Colvin CJ, Needle DB et al . The carbonic anhydrase inhibitor ethoxzolamide inhibits the mycobacterium tuberculosis PhoPR regulon and Esx-1 secretion and attenuates virulence. Antimicrob Agents Chemother 2015;59(8):4436–4445. doi: 10.1128/AAC.00719-15.

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Citation
The Pharmaceutical Journal, PJ, 22/29 August 2015, Vol 295, No 7876/7;295(7876/7):DOI:10.1211/PJ.2015.20069109